Articles tagged with: Industry

[ Jun 16 2015 - 8:09 am ]

Attendees of the NUFO annual meeting had the opportunity to tour ORNL, attend discussion panels, and participate in breakout groups in which they collaborated on specific topics of interest when the group met in Oak Ridge April 20–23.

[ Apr 8 2015 - 8:05 am ]

Researchers at UTRC are studying liquid atomization, or the breakup of liquid jets, to increase the efficiency of this process and thereby increase aircraft engine performance.

[ Nov 14 2014 - 10:37 am ]

In 2013, researchers at consumer-products giant Procter & Gamble and Temple University began using the Titan supercomputer to better understand the three-dimensional structure of skin’s outermost barrier, the stratum corneum.

[ Nov 11 2014 - 1:06 pm ]

KatRisk, a small California startup, is using Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Titan supercomputer, to create an unprecedented product: flood risk maps covering the globe.

[ Aug 25 2014 - 9:33 am ]

Consumer-products giant Procter & Gamble (P&G) has turned to Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) and America’s fastest supercomputer to simulate microscopic processes that can threaten product performance and stability.

[ Jul 23 2014 - 7:37 am ]

The Ken Kennedy Institute for Information Technology at Rice University hosted its annual Oil and Gas HPC Workshop in Houston, Texas.

[ Jun 30 2014 - 7:00 am ]

Three industry-related visualizations, created at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility, were highlighted at the fourth annual National User Facility Organization (NUFO) science expo and reception.

[ Jun 13 2014 - 6:40 am ]

Ramgen Power Systems is using the Titan supercomputer managed by the OLCF to optimize novel designs based on aerospace shock wave compression technology for gas compression systems, such as carbon dioxide compressors.

[ Mar 18 2014 - 12:41 pm ]

Titan user Masako Yamada of GE Global Research has been named one of HPCwire’s People to Watch 2014.

[ Jan 10 2014 - 9:11 am ]

Scientists at GE Global Research use Oak Ridge National Laboratory’s Titan, the world’s most powerful supercomputer, to simulate hundreds of water droplets as they freeze, with each droplet containing one million molecules.