People - Written by on June 8, 2015

OLCF Hosts CAAR Teams at Two Workshops

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The OLCF hosted two workshops for its Center for Accelerated Application Readiness this spring. The second of the two workshops was held June 2-3. Attending this event were (from L-R): Tjerk Straatsma, Mark Taylor, Joe Oefelein, Bob Walkup, Markus Eisenbach, Jeff Larkin, Donald Dazlich, Mark Berrill, Brian Rogers, Irina Demeshko, Judy Hill, Adrian Pope, Jack Wells, Salman Habib, Michael Robson, Stephane Ethier, Nicholas Frontiere, Seung-Hoe Ku , Arnold Tharrington, Jianying Lang, Valentine Anantharaj, Oscar Hernandez, Edo Apra, and Karol Kowalski.

The OLCF hosted two workshops for its Center for Accelerated Application Readiness this spring. The second of the two workshops was held June 2-3. Attending this event were (from L-R):
Tjerk Straatsma, Mark Taylor, Joe Oefelein, Bob Walkup, Markus Eisenbach, Jeff Larkin, Donald Dazlich, Mark Berrill, Brian Rogers, Irina Demeshko, Judy Hill, Adrian Pope, Jack Wells, Salman Habib, Michael Robson, Stephane Ethier, Nicholas Frontiere, Seung-Hoe Ku , Arnold Tharrington, Jianying Lang, Valentine Anantharaj, Oscar Hernandez, Edo Apra, and Karol Kowalski.

Spring events bring together key partners

DOE’s Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) hosted two identical kick-off workshops for members of the new Center for Accelerated Application Readiness (CAAR) partnership projects this spring. The second of the two events was held June 2-3.

The workshop brought together the members of the CAAR partnership teams, including core developers of the new CAAR applications, staff from the OLCF, members of the IBM/Nvidia Center of Excellence at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, and staff from the NERSC and ALCF facilities.

The kick-off workshops were designed to help the project teams begin preparations to ensure their scientific applications are ready to make effective use of Summit, OLCF’s next generation supercomputer, when it enters production.

Oak Ridge National Laboratory is supported by the US Department of Energy’s Office of Science. The single largest supporter of basic research in the physical sciences in the United States, the Office of Science is working to address some of the most pressing challenges of our time. For more information, please visit science.energy.gov.